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2020 Publication Award Nominations | Your Research Foundation | SECURE Act (Spring 2020, Vol. 10, No. 1)

Submit Your Nomination for the 2020 ROI Publication Award
Enter the competition to be recognized for your outstanding manuscript on an ROI priority research topic.
 
The ROI Is Your Research Foundation
ROI President Deborah A. Kuban, MD, FASTRO, shares how the ROI is working for you.
Shauna Campbell, DO
Shauna Campbell, DO, is Chief Resident at the Cleveland Clinic and the incoming Chair of ARRO. Hear her story about why she decided to become a member of the ROI Sustainers’ Circle.
The SECURE Act and its Impact on You and Your Future
Find out more about this new legislation that brings the most significant changes to retirement security since the Pension Protection Act of 2006.
Research Roundup
Learn about some of the exciting progress made over the past year by the investigators that you are supporting through your generous donations to the ROI.
New Web Pages Make Online Giving Easier
Explore the variety of giving options to support radiation oncology research.
Issue Index

The SECURE Act and its Impact on You and Your Future

The Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement (SECURE) Act was enacted on January 1, 2020. This legislation marks the most significant changes to retirement security since the Pension Protection Act of 2006.

The SECURE Act has three major components. First, you can contribute to your Individual Retirement Account (IRA) past the age of 70½. The second change is that the age when you are required to take minimum distribution (RMD) from retirement accounts changed to 72. And third, most non-spouse IRA and other retirement account beneficiaries must withdraw the entire amount within 10 years.

Prior to the SEURE Act, you could not contribute to your IRA past the age of 70½. This age limit has been repealed. Thus, you can save for retirement for a longer period of time to build up your retirement account.

The SECURE Act changed the age at which you must start taking RMDs from your retirement account from 70½ to 72. This change gives your account additional time to grow. Notably, for those born BEFORE July 1, 1949, the previous rules apply. Donors who turned 70½ in 2019 or earlier will have to continue to take required minimum distributions.

But you do not need to wait until you are 72 to make contributions to those causes about which you care. If you are 70½ or older, you can still transfer any amount up to $100,000 per year directly from your IRA to a qualified nonprofit, tax-free.  The gift does not count as income, so you benefit whether you itemize on your tax returns or not. The Radiation Oncology Institute (ROI), ASTRO’s Research Foundation, is a qualified nonprofit and can assist you in making this gift. The ROI will provide you with a sample letter that you can customize and use to communicate with your IRA administrator. By making a gift to the ROI now, you can see the impact of that gift on research in radiation oncology.

Making a gift from your IRA is an opportunity to leverage your most highly taxed assets. When IRAs are passed to loved ones, distributions from these accounts are subject to income taxes at the beneficiary’s ordinary income tax rate, which can be as high as 37% plus state income tax, depending on where they live. Rather than leaving these heavily taxed assets to family, consider giving from these accounts now and letting the value of other assets grow and eventually pass to loved ones.

You can stretch your inheritance in this way. By naming a Charitable Remainder Trust (CRT) as a beneficiary of an IRA, the IRA funds the trust after your lifetime. The trust will is designed to pay one or more beneficiaries income for life (or a term of up to 20 years) and at the end pay a remainder benefit to a charity of your choice. This will allow the beneficiaries to receive payments past the 10 years that non-spouses would have if they received the IRA funds themselves.

With the SECURE Act, some provisions of retirement plans change, but many aspects remain the same. You can name the ROI as a beneficiary of your IRA. You are encouraged to notify the ROI of your designation so that the ROI can thank you and can ensure that your gift is used exactly as you intended.

If you have questions about the impact of the SECURE Act, you are encouraged to make an appointment with your financial advisor. The advisor can answer other questions you have and can review your plans (including your beneficiary designation) and ensure that your wishes are documented.

The information in this article is not intended as legal or tax advice. For such advice, please consult an attorney or tax advisor. References to tax rates include federal taxes only and are subject to change.